British Fiction, 18001829

SCOTT, Sir Walter. Guy Mannering (1815)

Publishing Papers

Correspondence, Journals, and Memoirs:

Letter from Walter Scott to John Ballantyne.
17 Oct 1814.
I intend the new novel to operate as something more permanent than a mere accommodation & if I can but be permitted to do so I will print it before it is sold to any one & then propose 1st. to C[onstable] & Longman 2d. to Murray & Blackwd. to take the whole at such a rate as will give them one half of the free profits—granting acceptances which upon an editn. of 3000 which we will be quite authorized to print will amount to an immediate command of £1500 to this W[averley] may also couple the condition that they would take £500 or £600 of old stock. I own I am not solicitous to deal with Constable [465/466] alone—nor am I at all bound to offer him the new novel on any terms—but he knowing of the intention may expect to be treated with at least—although it is possible we may not deal. However if Murray & Blackwood were to come forwd. with any handsome proposal as to the stock or reg[iste]r I should certainly have no objection to James giving the proposed pledge on the part of the Author of W. for his next work.
Source: Grierson, I, 465–66; also see Millgate #265.
Notes: A version of this is also in Grierson, III, 506–07. The ‘register’ is the Edinburgh Annual Register, published by Ballantyne. The reference is likely to the fruitless attempts made at this time to sell the enterprise. ‘Stock’ refers to John Ballantyne’s unsold stock of books. Waverley is EN2 1814: 52.

Letter from Walter Scott to James Ballantyne.
[31 Oct 1814].
Longman must have the novel through you & they must be allowd to smell the cheese while toasting for them but of this when I come to town […].
Source: Grierson, I, 474; also see Millgate #271.
Notes: Date is from Corson, 33.

Letter from Walter Scott to John Ballantyne.
[9 Nov 1814].
In the mean while it will be necessary to propitiate the Leviathans of Pater Noster row. My idea is that you or James write to them to the following purport—that a novel is offerd you by the author of Waverley with the desire that you will print 2000 and publish yourself or arrange with publishers—the name is Guy Mannering—that you have proceeded accordingly & that the authors further desire is that the work may be out either before Mr. Scott’s poem or as soon thereafter as may be—that having resolved as they are aware entirely to relinquish publishing you only wish to avail yourself of this offer to the extent of helping off some of your stock & therefore wish to know if it would be agreeable to them to take such a work at prime cost vizt. Print paper & authors half of profits & grant acceptance at six mos. along with a handsome order on your other stock at usual credit. I leave it to you to consider whether you should condescend on any particular work to offer them as bread to their butter or on any particular amount—as an order to amot. of £500—or whether you should leave matters open untill their answer—One thing must be provided & that is that Constable shares to the extent of the Scottish sale—they however managing, for we must have their bills for the whole. This should I think lay foundation for £2000 at least early in february when it will be much wanted—Keep a scroll of your letter & read mine over carefully with James. My reason for letting them have a scent of roast meat is in case it be necessary to apply to them in Novr. or Decr. but not a hint of this must appear in the letter as I trust we may do without them.
Source: Grierson, I, 473; also see Millgate #270. Versions are in ACLC, 3, 79, and in Grierson, III, 505–06.
Notes: Date is from Corson, 33. The Leviathans are Longman & Co, whose premises were at Paternoster Row. Ballantyne apparently communicated the proposed terms for the novel to Longman on 15 Nov.

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
28 Nov 1814.
Messrs John Ballantyne & Co offered us in a letter of the 15th inst a new work by the author of Waverley intitled Guy Mannering on the terms that we pay paper and print at 6 months from shipment, pay the author half the estimated profits at 6 months, take £500-worth of John Ballantyne & Cos books on such terms as a publisher may be able to sell them at, with a condition that we offer you a quarter of that speculation if you choose to take it. These terms we accepted in a letter of which you have a copy annexed. // In their letter of the 25th received this day they state that they are satisfied with our acceptance of Guy Mannering and shall not differ about the price of the books. They also wish us rather than themselves to offer the conditions to you; which we now do—and beg your answer in course. // Messrs John Ballantyne & Co have already drawn on us for £500 6 Months. £421 they state were the profits on 2000 Waverley and [395/395v] the difference they propose carrying over to the second edition.
Source: E, MS 331, fol. 395 (copy).
Notes: The emphasis given in this copy to the passage relating to John Ballantyne’s unsold stock of books probably stems from a dispute concerning valuation in later negotiations, when the letter was again being referred to.

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
5 Dec 1814.
We inclose you a draft for £125, falling due on the day when we are to pay the £500 Bill for Guy Mannering; which you will please to accept payable in London. // We do not know what price paper Ballantyne is using for ‘Guy’; but we think you have been rather extravagant in ‘Waverley’. We seldom exceed 30/– P. Ream of 21½ qrs for Novels. The last we printed in Scotland was Gillies’ Confessions of Longueville [EN2 1814: 23]; for which Cowans supplied the paper at 28/– P. Rm. […] We thank you for the paper & print accounts of ‘Waverley,’ they will be some guide to us in settling respecting ‘Guy’. // The charge for printing seems high. When Ballantyne sends us the acct. of ‘Guy’ we shall investigate the charge he makes and report the result to you. Printers, as well as paper makers require looking after. // In publishing books on the plan of dividing profits, we have never charged commission, nor should we think of doing it; but as you are not equally favourably situated with ourselves it becomes a question how far you are warranted in making the charge; and it can only be settled between the publisher & author, unless you can find a precedent. John Ballantyne was continually in the habit of allowing us discounts on books which we understood be [sic] published with Mr Scott on the plan of dividing profits. How did he make up his accounts? // John Ballantyne informed us that ‘Guy Mannering’ was to be published before the Lord of the Isles: will you be so good as to announce it in the Scotch papers. Both Waverley & Alison are moving off very well.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 42 (draft).
Notes: All references to Waverley (EN2 1814: 52) in this letter are to the 3rd edn of the novel.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
21 Dec 1814.
We have advertised Guy Mannering as in the Press though we know it is not yet in that state of forwardness & we should suppose cannot be in the Printers hands till after the beginning of the year […] [164/165] […] The review of Waverley makes the Sale of Guy quite certain & we have no doubt of it selling every Copy we have left of Waverley […] The paper of Waverley you will observe is superior to that used for Novels generally, you should print Guy equally well.
Source: E, MS 789, pp, 164–65 (copy).
Notes: The reference is to Francis Jeffrey’s review of Waverley in the Edinburgh Review 24 (Nov 1814): 208–43. Waverley is EN2 1814: 52.

Diary Entry by John Ballantyne.
27 Dec [1814].
Read yesterday the beginning of Guy Mannering. Great promise in it.
Source: E, MS 2566, fol. 178 (copy).

Letter from Walter Scott to James Ballantyne.
[?Dec 1814–Jan 1815].
They shall not want Guy long I promise them.
Source: Grierson, III, 541; also see Millgate #973.
Notes: Date is conjectured from contents. Grierson places at the end of the 1814 letters; Millgate proposes Jan 1815.

Letter from Walter Scott to James Ballantyne.
[?early Jan 1815].
I send you more Guy. It is time to think of mottoes.
Source: Grierson, IV, 1; also see Millgate #975.
Notes: Grierson dates 1814–15; Millgate proposes Jan 1815 as likely. The letter includes the mottoes actually used for chapters 1 & 2, but says for chapter 3 ‘There is a good mottoe for this in Byroms poems which are in the Chalmers collection of British poets’. The motto eventually used is from Hudibras.

Letter from William Blackwood to John Murray II.
2 Jan [1815].
I had to call on Ballantyne this morning […]. The first part of Guy Mannering was lying on his table—he would not allow me to look at it, but he read me a few pages. The painting is admirable and quite graphic—Scottish to the life. From this specimen, and what B[allantyne] told me about it; it will be a wonderful performance, and greatly superior to Waverley, both in interest and effect.
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Blackwood Box 2; also in Smiles, I, 453 with errors and omissions.
Notes: The letter is dated Monday 3 o’clock. Blackwood misdates it 1814.

Letter from William Blackwood to John Murray II.
3 Jan [1815].
I regret the loss of Guy Mannering much more than this splendid 4to. I am anxious to hear about the Novel which you hint at […].
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Blackwood Box 2; also in Smiles, I, 453–54 with errors and omissions.
Notes: Blackwood misdates 1814. The ‘splendid 4to’ is Scott’s latest poem, Lord of the Isles (1815). Smiles conflates the letter from which this extract is taken with other letters.

Letter from William Blackwood to John Murray II.
11 Jan [1815].
I was as much surprized at the announce of Guy Mannering as you could be. I hear some people say it is to be a Border story. I have not seen Ballantyne since, nor do I wish to call upon him. I am quite disgusted and cannot comprehend Scott & Co at all. After making such [illeg.] and advances the while to end up merely in the offer of such a trifling Book as they proposed to us. But as you say a little time w[ill: tear in MS] probably clear up matters.
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Blackwood Box 2.
Notes: Blackwood misdates 1814.

Letter from William Blackwood to John Murray II.
14 Jan 1815.
The other night I was with James Ballantyne till near two o’clock in the morning, when he read me nearly the half of Guy Mannering. It is a most extraordinary production. The plot is at once natural and most interesting. The incidents and characters are most grap[phic: tear in ms] and picturesque. In fact I do not know any book which I ca[n: tear in ms] mention which could give you any idea of it, or so far as I [tear in ms] yet judge I could compare it to. It possesses humour, feeling and pathos in the highest degree. And what will astonish you when you read it, some of the most pathetic and affecting passages are in Scotch, and shew the author’s skill in the highest degree, as it is so difficult to avoid the vulgar or the ludicrous in our vulgar tongue. If Walter Scott be the Author of it, he stands far higher in my opinion in this line than in his former walk. Ballantyne made great professions of his regret that we were not the publishers—whether he is sincere or not time will prove—but he has great expectations of more from the same hand and says it will not be his fault if they do not take the proper direction. He is to have the whole of the MS. on Tuesday when we will have our second and I hope final sitting. I need not tell you to keep all this most strictly to yourself, as there would be the Devil to pay if the Crafty knew that I had seen or heard a line of it. Yesterday I wrote a letter of thanks to Ballantyne for the delight I had received, and expressed my feelings in the best way I could with regard to this beautiful production. I did not of course appear in it at all as the Bookseller, but merely as the Amateur. I know he will have shewn my letter to the author, and though humble the offering as it will be the first, it may perhaps be of some use to the Bookseller.
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Blackwood Box 2; also in Smiles, I, 453–54 with errors, from ‘If Walter Scott be….’ Smiles conflates this with Blackwood’s letter of 3 Jan.
Notes: This evidently the long letter Blackwood refers to in his of 5 Feb 1815 (see below). ‘The Crafty’ was used by both Blackwood and Murray to refer to Archibald Constable.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
17 Jan 1815.
Guy Mannering and 8vo Lord of the Isles are advancing rapidly.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 194 (copy).
Notes: The 8vo edn (effectively the 2nd edn) of Scott’s poem, The Lord of the Isles, was first published in Edinburgh on 1 Mar 1815 (Todd & Bowden, 81Ac).

Letter from Walter Scott to John Bacon Sawrey Morritt.
19 Jan 1815.
I want to shake myself free of Waverley and accordingly have made a considerable exertion to finish an odd little tale within such time as will mistify [sic] the public I trust unless they suppose me to [12/13] be Briareus. Two volumes are already printed and the only persons in my confidence W. Erskine and Ballantyne are of opinion it is much more interesting than Waverley. It is a tale of private life and only varied by the perilous exploits of smugglers and excisemen.
Source: Grierson, IV, 12–13; also see Millgate #983.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
28 Jan 1815.
[…] Guy Mannering we believe is getting forward and promises we understand to be equal to Waverly [sic].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 201 (copy).

Letter from James Ballantyne to Archibald Constable.
30 Jan 1815.
I am delighted to hear of your relish for Guy: for no man has a more lively and just tact for humour than your worship. The 2d volume is all in hand, and may be sent to you in print about the end of the week, if you chuse. The scenes in Edinburgh beat the Dutch. I promise you a pro-di-gi-ous roar.
Source: E, MS 23230, fol 59.
Notes: The allusions are to Dutch naturalist painting and to one of Dominie Sampson’s expressions within the novel.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to John Cumming.
1 Feb 1815.
Guy Mannering will be ready in about 3 weeks when your Orders shall meet due attention […].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 208 (copy).
Notes: Cumming was a Dublin bookseller.

Letter from William Blackwood to John Murray II.
5 Feb 1815.
In a long letter which I wrote you three weeks ago (and which I hope you recd. as there were some things in it which I should not like meet any other eye) I mentioned some particulars with regard to Guy Mannering. I have now finished the two first volumes and the more I see of it the more I am delighted with it. I am still quite puzzled with regard to the Author. Some circumstances have occurred which strengthen my suspicions with regard to Mr [William] Erskine having a hand in it—but still it is only suspicion. There is much greater invention, and far more feeling than I have ever seen Walter Scott display in any of his works. You will be surprized when I tell you that it has been whispered that the Ballantynes have some hand in it themselves. I was much astonished at hearing from Miller the other day, that the first intimation the Crafty received of it was from Longman & Co who offered him a share of this first edition, which was all they had got themselves. The C is most indignant at this, and thinks himself ill used, having done so much as conscious[?] for Waverly [sic]. Miller also told me that John Ballantyne transacted the whole with Longman & Co and made a demand for this edition proportioned to the profits arising from Waverly [sic] the accts. of which he said lay before him. L & Co have been giving Jas. Ballantyne a great deal of printing and the Crafty more. All things considered therefore I am fairly of opinion either that the Ballantynes have some hand in the Book, or that the property has been given entirely to their disposal. Perhaps the property may be purchased yet. When you see the book I am confident you will agree with me that there is no property of the kind that would be more desireable [sic].
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Blackwood Box 2. Smiles prints an edited version (and dates the letter 15 Feb), omitting the information about Constable; see Smiles, I, 454.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to John Cumming.
14 Feb 1815
We write now principally to say that we will not be able to afford you more than 100 Copies of Guy Mannering, our Orders are so numerous that with the small share we possess in it in proportion to what we had in Waverly [sic] our quantity is cut up—What we would send You over 100 we will have to purchase from Longman & Co at Sale Price—we would therefore recommend you not to Count on greater than above stated […] // We look to be able to send you Lord of the Isles & Guy &c in about 10 days.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 216 (copy).

Letter from Archibald Constable to Dugald Stewart
16 Feb 1815.
Guy Mannering will be out next week—this will be agreeable intelligence to Mr S. who shall have the first Copy I can lay my hands on—it beats the Dutch.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 220 (copy).
Notes: Addressed to Stewart at Boness; the allusion is to Dutch naturalist painting.

Letter from John Murray II to Lord Byron.
17 Feb 1815.
Every day I have been in expectation of receiving a copy of ‘Guy Mannering,’ of which the reports of a friend of mine, who has read the first two volumes, is such as to create the most extravagant expectations of an extraordinary combination of wit, humour and pathos. I am certain of one of the first copies, and this you may rely upon receiving with the utmost expedition.
Source: Smiles, I, 350.

Diary Entry by John Ballantyne.
19 Feb 1815.
Going to town to Castle Street on the conclusion of ‘Guy Mannering’.
Source: E, MS 2566, fol. 183 (copy).
Notes: Scott’s Edinburgh home was at 39 Castle Street.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
22 Feb 1815.
Messrs J. Ballantyne & Co. will have written about Guy Mannering—we think a new Edition should be put to Press immediately not under 3000—we have our Orders for our Share of that now ready.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 224 (copy).
Notes: An early reference to the commissioning of the 2nd edn.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
24 Feb 1815.
We write today to say that we have sold every Copy of our share of Guy—but we have used every precaution in Our power to prevent any of our Brethren from Sending Quantities p Mail—two difft. Persons pressed hard for Copies far beyond the Mark for their own Sale. We saw Ballantynes Warehouseman a little ago who assured us that 1500 were on their way to Leith for you, we wished to have intercepted 50 Copies for the purpose of sending you them p Mail but were too late in our application, as after all our Caution we should not be surprised to hear that you meet with a little Anticipation in that way—I had a Call from a gentleman deeply interested in the Work. We mentioned the demand […] suggesting the necessity of another edition without any delay [227/228] & that it should be 3000 copies, he seemed very willing that it should be so—in case that Ballantyne should not communicate with you on the Subject—Will you authorise us to arrange the matter in case you should want a copy for subscribing to the trade we have sent you one.
Source: E, MS 789, pp. 227–28 (copy).
Notes: The ‘gentleman deeply interested in the work’ is almost certainly Scott.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to John Cumming.
24 Feb 1815.
We have this day sent you per Mail to Liverpool care of Roose & Son 50 Copies of Guy Mannering and we regret to say that we cannot send you more of this Edition—the great Interest that has arisen for this Book has caused us to be beset in a manner you can have little idea of, and tomorrow we will not have a Copy to Supply our own Retail Customers—the Book was only published this day here and of some subscriptions for One Hundred we could only deliver 25 copies. // As the book cannot be in London for at least Eight days, you may make the best use you can of the advantage these now sent will give you.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 228 (copy).
Notes: The 1st edn was published in Edinburgh on 24 Feb 1815, some time before it was possible to release copies in London.

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
25 Feb 1815.
We will subscribe Guy Mannering on Monday, & write to you as to a new edition, for we shall then be better able to judge as to the demand. […] We have fixed the price of ‘Guy’ the same as Waverley, which we doubt not will meet your approbation.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 69 (draft).

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne & Co.
28 Feb [1815].
As the first edition of Guy Mannering is likely to be sold almost immediately on its arrival in London, a new edition of 3000 shd be proceeded on with every possible expedition. We will thank you to inform us when you expect it will be got ready.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 71 (draft).
Notes: Year in square brackets appears as given in the typed transcript of the letter in the Longman Archives. The typed transcript records deleted words that are not given here.

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
28 Feb 1815.
You really shd not have pubd Guy M. without allowing time for our copies to arrive by sea. We have before pointed out to you & as we thought convinced you of the unpleasant situation in which we are placed when copies of new works have been rec’d by the Mail by other booksellers before we, as the London pubrs, publish the book regularly to the trade. As it can make little or no difference to you, we hope you will make a point of obviating in future the chance of our being so situated. Our having 50 copies by the Mail ourselves would not obviate the difficulty as we do not think it right to circulate them. We have written to Ballantyne requesting he will proceed with a new edition of 3000 with every possible expedition. We have subscribed and ordered about 1200 which will leave us a surplus of 300 for sale. We shall of course arrange matters with Ballantyne in the same manner as for the first edition.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 72 (draft).
Notes: The typed transcript of this letter in the Longman Archives records deleted words that are not given here.

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
2 Mar 1815.
[…] as Mr Ballantyne has drawn on us for £449. 1. 8 the paper & print of the second edition of ‘Guy Mannering’, we have drawn on you for £112. 5. 5 from the same date being your portion; which you will please to accept payable in London. John Ballantyne states, that only £50 was allowed in stating the authors account for printing the first 4000 of Waverley. In the estimate you gave us, you mention £35 for the first 1000, & £25 for the 2d edn of 2000, making together £60 for 3000. Not less than £60 certainly shd be allowed for the first 4000 ‘Guy’.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 74A.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
4 Mar 1815.
We quite accord with every thing you say as to the publication of Guy Mannering and our hand in the matter you complain of is explained very easily—The Book was ready on the Wednesday [i.e. 22 Feb] and we had resolved not to subscribe it till the following week—but on that day Ten Copies were circulated in Town to the authors friends by Mr Ballantyne of which we knew nothing till the Friday when we were assaulted from all quarters for the Book & positively compelled to subscribe it that day. // Booksellers wanted 100 each obviously to go to London. [232/233] One got 25 the other 3 of the first Six were sent to London per Mail, and we were handsomely told more would have gone if we would have parted with them, this of course was declined.
Source: E, MS 789, pp. 232–33 (copy).

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
4 Mar 1815.
[The letter proper concerns Scott’s poem The Lord of the Isles and The Antiquary (EN2 1816: 52).] [postscript] Guy is not arrived.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 74 (draft).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to John Cumming.
9 Mar 1815.
We wrote you with advice of 50 Guy Mannering—since which the Book has been out of Print—a new Edition is at Press but our demands are so great and so pressing that we are at a loss to say how many we will be able to Spare you, not greatly above 50— // […] [237] we inclose Draft for the Lord of the Isles & Guy—at the regular discount we allow you but we are a little doubtful of being able to allow you 10 per Cent on the future Editions of Guy this properly being what we term the Authors’.
Source: E, MS 789, pp. 236–37 (copy).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
10 Mar 1815.
We are favord with your statement of Profits on new Edition of Guy and return you Bill accepted—we are promised that it will be ready at this day week.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 238 (copy).
Notes: Refers to the 2nd edn.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne & Co.
13 Mar 1815.
We have duly received yours enclosing a Bill for Sixty pounds, and we return you Mundells bill agreeable to your request. // You will observe the bill is for 160. 10. 0 besides expences. The difference may be settled with the £100 overdrawn on Guy M. when you come to town. […] The second edition of ‘Guy’ is much wanted & we shall be very happy if the market be clear for the 3rd edition by the time you mention We shall order from your list in a day or two on a/c of the ‘Astrologer’.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 88 (draft).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
18 Mar 1815.
The new Edition of Guy Mannering is nearly finished and our share nearly sold […].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 248 (copy).
Notes: Meaning in effect that the printing of the 2nd edn is nearly complete, and that the firm has already subscribed its (quarter) share to the trade.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
20 Mar 1815.
We return you the Draft for £449. 1. 8 for Paper & Print of Guy Mannering though you have overdrawn for Authors Profits, independent of the £100, to a small amount, which we can settle when we meet. You mention that only 150 was allowed for Advertising 4000 Waverley. You will recollect the 1st edition was 1000 and the second 2000 making 3000. On the first we understood £35 was allowed for Adv[er]t[ising] and on the second £25 making £60 as we stated in our former letter. You have most likely taken the 2d and 3d editions.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 82 (draft).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
4 Apr 1815.
We understand from Messrs B[allantyne] & Co that a New Edition of Guy Mannering is at Press, but will not be ready for some weeks, and that it is their intention on Account of the Author to propose that in bringing this impression, we purchase Books of their Stock to the extent of £500—as the communication will come through you, we wish to impress upon you that this is a most unreasonable proposal, And that we hope you will resist such a large purchase from their Stock for so small a number of Guy Mannering—they only asked £500 on the first 4000 of this Novel and £600—on 5000 [i.e. of The Antiquary] now in progress we therefore conceive they cannot look for a purchase of more than £250—on 2000 of ‘Guy’ now at Press— [….] [postscript] We will take 1/4 [quarter] share in any arrangement you may make in this matter.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 261 (copy).
Notes: Refers to the 3rd edn, printed by May 1815, but not immediately advertised. The Antiquary is EN2 1816: 52.

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
7 Apr 1815.
We thank you for your letter respecting the 3d edition of Guy; and as we are quite of your opinion we shall be cautious what we do, particularly as we feel that the Quarterly Review has very much injured the sale of the book— As we have 1113 copies remaining of the Second edition, we think it premature to make any arrangement at present as to another edition. // We find the sale of Waverley also very heavy; our present stock is 400 and though it has been constantly kept before the public in the advertizements of Guy we have sold but 108 since the 7th of March // Be so good as to inform us what you have expended in advertizing Guy, that we may not overrun our allowance.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 91 (draft).
Notes: The reference is to the review in Quarterly Review 12 (Jan 1815): 501–09, by John Wilson Coker.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne & Co.
8 Apr 1815.
The number received of Guy 2nd Edn at first was 1394 & not 1400 as advised. They were counted twice by our people.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 89A.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
10 Apr 1815.
We have yours of the 7th and are sorry to hear you have so many Guy on hand—the Review in the Quarterly has we assure you done the Book no harm here—but has rendered the Review itself contemptable [sic]—you may ship us immediately 250 copies—And you can value for them and those we have got of the first and this Edition before in the same manner that we drew upon you for the supplies of Waverly—we have expended £14.8.6 on Advertising ‘Guy &c’.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 264 (copy).

Letter from John Murray II to James Hogg.
10 Apr 1815.
If I had been aware of it in time I certainly would have [347/348] invited your remarks on ‘Mannering.’ Our article is not good and our praise is by no means adequate, I allow, but I suspect you very greatly overrate the novel. ‘Meg Merrilies’ is worthy of Shakespeare, but all the rest of the novel might have been written by Scott’s brother or any other body.
Source: Smiles, I, 347–48.
Notes: Murray is inviting Hogg to contribute critiques of ‘new Scottish works’ to the Quarterly. John Wilson Croker wrote the review of Guy Mannering for the Quarterly.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to James Ballantyne.
13 Apr 1815.
As to Guy we think it right to let you know how it is doing—we regret not so well as we could wish—By a letter from Longman & Co of the 7th instant our hopes as to it are very much damped—they say the ‘The Quarterly Review has very much injured the Sale of the Book, as we have 1113 Copies remaining of the second Edition We think it premature to make any arrangement at present as to another Edition […]’.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 267 (copy).
Notes: Constable is quoting the letter from Longman of 7 Apr.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
15 Apr 1815.
We understand that a new Edition of ‘Guy’ is or will be out in a day or two!!! […].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 267 (copy).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Gale, Curtis & Fenner.
[15–17 Apr 1815]
Guy Mannering 2d Edition are all gone here.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 268 (copy).
Notes: Date range from position in Letter Book. Gale, Curtis & Fenner were London booksellers.

Letter from Owen Rees to Archibald Constable & Co.
19 Apr 1815.
In reply to what you state respecting Guy Mannering we have to observe that Jno Ballantyne has just been with us, &, we having having [sic] informed him on Monday that there were about 1000 copies remaining, including the 250 sent you, he put the question, ‘what are we to do with the edition printing of Guy?’ We replied, it must be kept back till the books now in hand are sold, as at present it was impossible for us to fix a value on them: to this he seemed to acquiesce & requested me to write a letter to James to the effect of the annexd. which is sent by this post. He enquired whether you had authorized us to treat on your behalf respecting this book & we replied in the affirmative.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 93.
Notes: The typed transcript of this letter in the Longman Archives records one deleted word that is not given here. The ‘sic’ appears as given in the typed transcript.

Letter from Longman & Co to James Ballantyne.
19 Apr 1815.
Your Brother John who has just been with us requested that we will inform you that, as, there are about 1000 copies of Guy Mannering in the Trade it will not be necessary to hasten the new edition but that you should turn all your force to get the Lord of the Isles done […].
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 94.
Notes: The 1000 copies mentioned in this letter refer to unsold copies of the 2nd edn of Guy.

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
9 May 1815.
We annex a copy of the arrangement which we have entered into with Mr Ballantyne respecting the 3000 Guy Mannering, we consider you as partners as before, & we shall draw on you for your portion. Of course it will be necessary to sell the whole of the 2nd Edn of which we have 534 left—before we touch the 3rd Ed. & from the nature of the agreement we must stock the entire of the 2nd & 3rd Thousand. You will be so good as to inform Ballantyne what no. you may advise to remain for the Edinbro’ sales. & if you take them into your warehouse you must give your people strict directions that none of the 3rd Edit. are to be sold at present, or till all the 2nd are gone from both you & us. If you have sold the 250 we sent you we will send more.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99. no. 99 (draft).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
12 May 1815.
We are favor'd with yours of the 9th & have agreeable thereto desired Messrs Ballantynes Co to deliver to us 750 Copies of Guy Mannering 3d Editions [sic], and you may rely on our attention [285/286] to the nature of your agreement with Mr John Ballantyne which is a very proper one. // We have 84 Copies left of the 250 last received from you. Your Bills for the Paper & Print shall be accepted when presented.—we hope you have taken a good allowance for Advertising, a good Review in E[dinburgh]R[eview] No 49 will carry off a considerable portion of those printed.
Source: E, MS 789, pp. 285–86 (copy).
Notes: No review of this novel actually appeared in the Edinburgh Review.

Letter from Robert Cadell to John Ballantyne.
13 May 1815.
[postscript] Your bargain for Guy 3d Edition will learn you where your interest lays—you are £1000 minus in funds by giving the management to Longman & Co—so much for a stroke of Policy.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 286 (copy).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to John Cumming.
13 May 1815.
Annexed you have Invoice of Guy Mannering & Discipline, we have no Waverley left—on the first we cannot afford you the usual allowance as they are purchased over our own share— // There is a new Work in progress by the same author ‘The Antiquary’ of which there will be no want of Copies—we will supply you fully.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 288 (copy).
Notes: Refers in process to Mary Brunton’s Discipline (EN2 1814: 14).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
22 May 1815
[Returning Longmans’ bill for their share of the 3rd edn].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 292 (copy).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to John Ballantyne.
28 Sept 1815.
Our present stock of Guy Mannering is four hundred & six Copies.
Source: E, MS 789, p. 406 (copy).

Letter from Lady Caroline Lamb to John Murray II.
[?1815]
Thanks for Guy of Manwaring [sic].
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives. Byron Box 4A, Folder 3.
Notes: The date is conjectured from contents.

Letter from Lady Caroline Lamb to John Murray II.
[?1815].
There are good characters I think in Guy—the Scotch Lawyer—the Farmer—Captain Hatterick—the Gipsies—& Browne [sic] himself as a modern Tom Jones. It certainly cannot be called a bad novel. It is written by a clever man—a man who knows human nature & has looked as closely as Claude Lauraine [sic] on views of skie [sic] & water & rocks—but there is not much genius there was more in Waverley—there is none any where that I see & now that the Newspaper is so interesting it is difficult to read at all. My novel is nearly finished—will you read it and honestly return it. It is very incorrect very dull. Very full of faults but I shall persevere till I finish it & then it may light the next Bon fire any Lady is compelled to kindle if you don’t like it & if you do I’ll dedicate it to you. [...] I cried over Meg Merrilies—when she met Browne [sic] again at the little Inn [page torn] Cumberland & my tears are not apt to flow.
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Byron Box 4A, Folder 1.
Notes: Lamb’s own novel is unidentified in this letter.

Letter from Lady Caroline Lamb to John Murray II
[1815].
In the first place I entirely deprecate your opinion concerning Manwaring [sic] or sooner the opinion you had borrowed for I am convinced if you had read it through or even half you would have admired it excessively. I judge by myself who can never get over ten Pages of any Book yesterday—I finished it & liked it better than I did Waverley. The story is better told the Hero more interesting the Gypsies delightful the characters very well drawn indeed. All good in short except the love and the Ladies which are flippant & vulgar as is the Fashion now.
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Byron Box 4A, Folder 1.
Notes: Letter is postmarked 1815.

Letter from Lady Catherine Mackintosh to John Murray II.
[?1815]
Did you hear who this new author of ‘Waverley’ and ‘Guy Mannering’ is? Mrs Thomas Scott, as Mr Thomas Scott assured Lord Selkirk (who had been in Canada), and his lordship, like Lord Monboddo, believes it.
Source: Smiles, I, 474.
Notes: Date is conjectured from contents. Thomas Douglas, fifth earl of Selkirk (1771–1820), was a friend of Walter Scott and author of Observations on the Present State of the Highlands of Scotland (London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme; Edinburgh: Archibald Constable & Co, 1805). Scott cites Selkirk’s work in the ‘Postscript, which should have been a Preface’ to Waverley. Selkirk established a colony on St John’s island in Canada and was involved in various plans to develop settlements there. James Burnett, Lord Monboddo (1714–1799) was best-known as the author of Of the Origin and Progress of Language, 6 vols (Edinburgh, 1773–92).

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
27 Jan 1816.
We thank you for the copy of Pauls letters just recd.—As it is only a few weeks since we had not the most pleasant correspondence with Mr J. B. respecting the Antiquary we should not at present wish to say more on the subject—Jno Ballantyne has written to us respecting ‘Guy Mannering’ (2nd 1000 of last Ed.) but before we can answer him we must beg you will be so good as to inform us what number of copies you have remaining of this Edition.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 166 (draft).
Notes: Letter is misdated 1815. Scott’s Paul’s Letters to His Kinsfolk was published in Edinburgh on 25 Jan 1816 (Todd & Bowden, 89Aa)

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
5 Feb 1816.
We have on hand 212 Guy Mannering […].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 489 (copy).

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne & Co
12 Feb 1816.
We are sorry to have to state that the state of the sale of Guy Mannering is not such as to warrant your draft for we have 2060 / & Constable [has] 212 / making a total of — 2272 / We should however hope that very soon after the publication of the Antiquary we should break in on the 2nd 1000. The draft shall be given to our Cashier, & returned to you accepted whenever this shall be the case.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 176 (draft).

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
12 Feb 1816.
We are happy to find that the Antiquary is at press & that we are likely to have it shortly […] We have 2060 of [Guy] Mannering remaining which added to your 212 of the first [edition leaves 2272] unsold. Jno Ballantyne has sent a Bill for our [acceptance on] acct. of the 2nd 1000 which we have declined to [several words missing] the 2nd 1000.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 177 (draft).
Notes: All square brackets and material therein, with the exception of the ellipses, appear as given in the typed transcript in the Longman Archives.

Letter from Longman & Co to James Ballantyne & Co.
18 Mar 1816.
In one of your letters you told us you had 18 copies of Guy Mannering wanting a sheet. We informed you that we had the sheet and requested you to send up the books. This has not been done.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 186 (draft).

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
4 Apr 1816.
We have accepted to John Ballantyne & Co £235 on account of the second 1000 Guy Mannering, having just broken in on that number, or about it. We have therefore drawn on you for £58. 15. 0 one fourth; which Bill you will please to accept & Return us. You may observe that our present acceptance to B. is £10 more than the last; this arises from our having charged him £10 towards advertising former editions in the last settlement.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 194 (draft).

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
13 Apr 1816.
We return accepted your draft for Guy Mannering […].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 543 (copy).

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
19 Apr 1816.
We have duly received your Acceptance for Guy Mannering […].
Source: MS letter (draft), Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 201 (draft).

Letter from William Blackwood to John Murray II.
6–7 May 1816.
I have seen several people who have read the Antiquary and they all agree with me that it is greatly inferior to Guy Mannering in general interest, but abounds in naivete and admirable sketches of character—it cannot however be properly appreciated except by a Scotsman.
Source: MS letter, Murray Archives, Blackwood Box 2.
Notes: This is a two-part letter. The part from which this passage is taken is dated by Blackwood Monday Night 11 Oclock, that is, 6 May.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Simpkin & Marshall.
7 May 1816.
[Guy Mannering ‘at present out of Print’, but will be sent ‘at Sale’ [price] when ready].
Source: E, MS 789, p. 562 (copy).

Letter from Longman & Co to Archibald Constable & Co.
14 May 1816.
J. Ballantyne has solicited us to make the last payment on Guy Mannering; to which, by the agreement, he is not entitled till all the 3000 are sold off; only wishing us to grant a Bill at 12 Months instead of six. This we have declined, as we have 1838 copies remaining, besides what may be in your hands. […] Of the Antiquary we have 600 Copies remaining. How does it stand with you.
Source: MS letter (draft), Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 222.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
14 May 1816.
We regret that the state of the sale of Guy Mannering does not warrant our complying with your wishes, or we should do so with the greatest pleasure. There are 1838 Copies remaining in our stock, besides what may be at Constables. The Antiquary is so much liked that we hope the sale of the other works will be increased by its publication.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 99, no. 223 (draft).

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
1 Dec 1816.
[Letter is primarily concerned with settling bills and accounts.] There are some other matters which we very much wish to have cleared up & you will greatly oblige us by attending to them immedy & have the books sent off. The particulars are stated on the other side. Two or three of the queries attach to Mr Jas B. & you will be so good as to communicate them to him. As we have between 1100 & 1200 copies of Guy M. left nothing can be done at present on that matter
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 100, no. 36 (draft).

Letter from Longman & Co to James Ballantyne.
9 Jan 1817.
We have stated your account on the other side; and inclose you a Bill for the Balance we have credited you with 15/1 which we will thank you to pay Mr Jno Ballantyne. […] The state of Delivery of Guy Mannering which you have sent is that of the 2nd Edit. We allude to the 3rd edition Your letter of the 19th of May 1815 states the number delivered to Messrs Constable & Co 750, In the same letter you say, ‘We have 18 more copies of Guy Mannering, only wanting sig O Vol 2 to complete them. Could Messrs L & Co. supply that sheet from the waste of the 1t & 2d Edition,’ In reply to this we informed you that we had the sheet & begged you would send up the books; which has not yet been done.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman 1, 100, no. 55 (draft).

Letter from Walter Scott to Joanna Baillie.
17 Mar 1817.
I had occasion (this in strict confidence) to make some enquiries at a sure hand concerning the sale of the popular novels and I have this result from a sure hand.
Waverley managed by Constable 9000 copies
G. Mannering—Longman 5000
Antiquary—Constable 8000
Tales of my Landlord—(Murray) 8000
I cannot think there would have been this inferiority of sale in the case of Guy Mannering to all the others had the work been equally well husbanded.
Source: Grierson, IV, 412; see Millgate #1199.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
12 May 1817.
In reply to your letter we beg to state that we did not estimate the books which we took from you in the transaction respecting Guy Mannering at any rated discount below sale price, but we valued them at such prices as we [deleted: then] thought we might be able to sell them at [deleted: a trade sale in London] [deleted: in compliance with the terms of the agreement. Many of which] a trade sale in London. // As we are now making a sale to the trade (or rather we shall make one next week) you will oblige us by transmitting us a list of your stock by return of the Mail that we may make a selection of articles.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 100, no. 95 (draft).

Letter from Walter Scott to John Ballantyne.
6 Sept [1817].
I wish while in London you would make particular inquiry into the state of all my works poems etc. and bring me a note of the result as specially as possible. I am ill satisfied with Longmans conduct in the Guy Mannering concern—that work one of the best of the kind has been managed to much less advantage than any other & I think seriously of putting it into Constable’s hands especially as they seem to have given up printing in Edinburgh.
Source: Grierson, I, 517; also see Millgate #312.
Notes: Year is from the postmark. Scott felt that Longman & Co had been slow in selling their copies of the novel, and he mentions this in a number of letters.

Letter from Walter Scott to James Ballantyne.
[6 Oct 1817].
I should like to know when Guy Mannering & Waverly [sic] will be out.
Source: Grierson, I, 521; also see Millgate #315.
Notes: Date is from Corson, 36. Reference is to the 7th edn of Waverley and the 4th edn of Guy Mannering.

Letter from Walter Scott to John Ballantyne.
11 Oct [1817].
I expect your accot. of Waverley & will consider accurately what you say on that subject. As to G. M. I am quite determined to take a third. L[ongman] & R[ees] behaved very sorrily in that business.
Source: Grierson, I, 522; also see Millgate #317.
Notes: Year is from contents. He means negotiating Ballantyne’s 1/3 share in the impression. See also Cadell’s letter of 6 Dec 1817.

Letter from Walter Scott to John Ballantyne.
17 Oct 1817.
What you propose concerning the retention of a share in G. M. & W[averle]y to be kept in your name for the authors benefit seems quite reasonable. If a third amounts to £179 you may strike off £29 which will be about £20 pr. cent discount as allowance to the publishers & some agent-fee to yourself. They should be allowd I think from £12 to £15 pr. cent. You will take your own time & manner to intimate this to the parties. I think the managing House should have the offer of this third in the first place that is Constable in the case of Waverley & Longman in that of Guy. I will not receive it as an objection to this plan that they have hitherto had these works on easier terms which rather forms a reason for my now making a little more by them. But I do not intend in any case to enhance the terms now proposed which I think are fully adequate & as there is every reason to believe that the works will remain with the same publishers (although of course I will come under no engagement to that effect direct or implied) it will I think be very proper to equalize the shares in both works 1/3d to each to Longman namely Constable & yourself as Agent for the author.
Source: Grierson, I, 524; also see Millgate #319.
Notes: In a postscript Scott includes rough calculations of the potential profits to be made from Tales of My Landlord, Second Series (£4000), and new editions of Tales of My Landlord (£1500), Waverley (£650), and Guy Mannering (£650), along with the disposal of the stock of John Ballantyne’s publishing business (£4000). His total, including profit to be made on printing and paper is £13800, a sum that he finds ‘extraordinary’. See Grierson, I, 525.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
20 Oct 1817.
In reply to your letter, we beg to state that we are willing to take the new edition of ‘Guy Mannering’. The terms, we conclude are to be as before. // As to the ‘Tales of my Landlord’, you shall hear from us again as soon as Mr Orme, who was present at forming of the Agreement, returns from France; which we expect will be in the course of the present week. [postscript] We have 197 of the last edition of Guy Manering [sic] & we have sent Constable & Co 50 a few days back.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 100, no. 145 (draft).
Notes: ‘[sic]’ appears as given in the typed transcript of the letter in the Longman Archives.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
8 Nov 1817.
We wrote to you on the 3rd accepting your proposal respecting Waverley, Guy Mannering, and the Antiquary // We are now favoured with your letter of the 4th with a Copy of the letter of the Author to you. This letter states that, ‘the whole matter in dispute is the right of management with the over Copies, minus the expence of advertising.’ This we consider so trifling a matter, that, if it is all the variation from our terms, we accept your offer: But what principally weighed with us was the different manner which we had indistinctly learnt, of valuing the stock that was to be taken of Messrs John B & Co. Your letter of terms to Messrs Constable & Co. of the 2nd October does not specify the exact terms upon which they were to take the books, and only states ‘as formerly’. When Mr Rees was in Edinburgh he found a difference in the statement of yourself and that of Messrs Constable & Co as to the terms of discount for the books to be taken for Rob Roy. In the case of Guy Mannering our agreement was that the books were to be ‘at our own valuation, or to be submitted to the valuation of two Booksellers, one to be chosen by you and one by ourselves’; and you admitted to Mr Rees when in Edinburgh that the clause in our agreement respecting the valuation of the Stock for the ‘Tales’ was under all circumstances quite equitable // We have above conditionally accepted your terms for the Tales; but if it is not correct that there is no other variation than what relates to the management and overplus books, we request you will be so good as to transmit us the detailed particulars of the Terms, and you shall receive our immediate answer. [postscript] When may we expect Rob Roy? We hope you have forwarded the books we ordered from your Stock on account of this work.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 100, no. 166 (draft).
Notes: Rob Roy is EN2 1818: 55.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
13 Nov 1817.
I may note here, that I saw in Ballantyne’s Printing Office today, that Guy Mannering New Edition is almost ready L[ongman] & C have no share in this if they do not take the Tales.
Source: E, MS 322, fol. 164v.
Notes: Headed ‘Thursday evening’. Evidently referring to the 4th edn of Guy. By ‘the Tales’ is meant Tales of My Landlord, Second Series (EN2 1818: 56).

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
1 Dec 1817.
As we have at present about 100 of the old Edition of Guy Mannering, which with our third share will last some time, we would rather not take your third at 12½ below sale—at present.— // You have made an error in charging the printing, taking the amount from the last edition of 3000 instead of the 2nd edition which was 121. 13. 9 minus 13. 14. 4 for alterations.—We have therefore restated the a/c. on the other side.—You may draw on us for the amount of paper & print and author’s money; and send us at the same time your bills for your shares. […] We are happy to find that Rob Roy gets on apace; our friends are most impatient for it. Pray send us the first copy you can by the Mail for private perusal.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 100, no. 181 (draft).
Notes: Relates to the 4th edn. Written below the signature of this letter is Longman’s restatement of the account, apparently for the 2nd edn. which shows the cost of printing 2000 copies to be 107. 19. 5 (121. 13. 9, less 13. 14. 4 for alterations to the 1st and 2nd edns). 206 reams of paper, at 1. 3. 0 a ream cost 236. 18. 0, bringing the amount for printing and paper to 344. 17. 5. The 2000 copies are then accounted for at a trade price of 0. 13. 9, giving a total of £1375. When reduced by the cost of printing and paper, this amounts to £1030 (the costs are rounded up to £345). Half of this, or £515, is for the author, and the other half divided equally amongst the 3 publishers (171. 13. 4 each).

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
6 Dec 1817
We return the two Bills for Guy Mannering excepted [i. e. accepted], and we have to acknowledge the receipt of you[r] bill for the third share. We shall draw on Constable & Co: you will let the books be shipped immediately.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 100, no. 184.
Notes: Relates to the 4th edn.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
6 Dec 1817.
John D[oe] has been with me about Guy—I have agreed on the same terms as Waverley only 18mos for the 1/3 [third] we purchase—we thus take the management and get the over copies.
Source: E, MS 322, fol. 213.
Notes: Referring to the firm’s purchase of John Ballantyne’s nominal share of a third of this impression. John Doe was Cadell’s nickname for John Ballantyne.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
8 Dec 1817.
John Doe and I are bickering about Guy Mannering—he says one thing and writes another on all occasions which I am not in the habit of allowing just now.
Source: E, MS 322, fol. 216v.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
12 Dec 1817.
I have settled with John D[oe] at 18 mo for the 1/3 [third] of Guy—we get all the over Copies—he wanted a Bill at 12 mos renewable which I would not agree to, we will sell all the Books in good time I trust.
Source: E, MS 322, fol. 225.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to John Cumming.
19 Dec 1817.
We duly receive yours of the 12th Instant, and shall forward the Guy Mannering […] you want […].
Source: E, MS 790, p. 85 (copy).

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
19 Dec 1817.
[…] as to Guy Mannering I would not take J[ohn] D[oe]’s share but on condition of getting the over copies—I have his letter on the [238v/239] subject, I conceive we have nothing to say to L[ongman] and Co. on the subject We compacted with John B[allantyne] to whom they may have recourse, and it will teach them when to refuse—it may be as well as to refer them to this, and I will send a copy of the letters that passed.
Source: E, MS 322, fols 238v-39.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
15 Jan 1818.
I mentioned [280v/281] to Mr S. that there was a German translation of Guy Mannering among Davids Collections in Germany—which I will get and take to Castle St. he wants to see David […] but it would not do for him to take Guy in case Mr S. feels hurt at the exposé.
Source: E, MS 322, fols 280v-281; ACLC, III, 107.
Notes: Referring presumably to David Constable, Archibald Constable’s eldest son. 39 Castle Street was Scott’s Edinburgh residence.

Letter from Longman & Co to John Ballantyne.
30 Jan 1818.
[Thanks Ballantyne for his assistance in clearing up a misunderstanding about Rob Roy, which is selling very well.] I should have written to you before respecting the books which we were to take from you for £200 which we accepted for you in consideration of the Rob Roy agreement. If you will refer to the agreement for Rob Roy you will find that we were to accept for £200 for books ‘the value of the stock to be rated in the same manner in the cases of Guy Mannering & Antiquary’. The agreement for Guy was that we were to take the books ‘on such terms as a publisher may be able to sell our books at’. And the Antiquary ‘on the same terms as Guy Mannering.’ The books which we took on these two agreements were valued by us conscienciously [sic] in confirmity [sic] to these terms. In the present instance it was our intention strictly to follow the same principle: but, as we wish to avoid every alteration we will if it meet your approbation refer the valuation of the books in the list we sent you to the decision of two indifferent persons, one to be chosen by you & the other by ourselves.
Source: Longman Archives, Longman I, 100, no. 219 (draft).
Notes: The typed transcript of this letter in the Longman Archives records a deleted word that is not given here.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
21 Jan 1819.
Please […] state how you stand with Waverley—Guy Mannering—Antiquary and Rob Roy.
Source: E, MS 790, p. 334 (copy).
Notes: Scott’s Rob Roy is EN2 1818: 55.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Hurst, Robinson & Co.
17 Apr 1819.
Please to say when you first write how [459/460] Waverly [sic]—Guy Mannering—Tales of my Landlord 2d Series &c go off with you.
Source: E, MS 790, p. 459–60 (copy).

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
20 Oct 1819.
Guy Mannering all gone.
Source: E, MS 323, fol. 19v.
Notes: Part of Cadell’s notes on the Albion sale in London, at which he states 103 booksellers were present. Presumably referring here to a clearing out of the 4th edn.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
16 Nov 1819.
Guy Mannering should be reprinted without any delay—L[ongman] & Co are behaving most shabbily about them—they will only exchange for the 3d Tales which I wont and cant give.
Source: E, MS 323, fol. 69.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
17 Nov 1819.
Guy Mannering is so wanted and there is so little chance of our getting an Edition ready by Jas B[allantyne] & Co for three months to come—that I could easily manage an edition of 1500 or 2000 Copies at Davisons in a week—we can say if it is found out that our Sale orders called for it—and their office may [be] too full to undertake it—without some early plan we are losing the Sale of the Books. I could manage long credit on both paper and printing—and there can be no harm in keeping an edition out of view [70v/71] of these fellows.
Source: E, MS 323, fols 70v-71.
Notes: Cadell is testing out the idea of commissioning a London printer instead of James Ballantyne & Co, a scheme subsequently rejected by Constable as impolitic in view of Scott’s known insistence that his works be printed by Ballantyne. Thomas Davison was a London printer.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
19 Nov 1819.
I am very angry with Longman Co about the Suppt and Guy Mannering […] I think we should reprint Guy imm[ediatel]y—Robinson wants them greatly—and I suppose there is not one at Edinb—I could draw 1500 or 2000 from Davison in a week—there could be no harm in doing this to keep the market supplied […].
Source: E, MS 323, fol. 73.
Notes: The other reference is to the Supplement to the Encyclopaedia Britannica (1815–24), one of Constable & Co’s most substantial commitments at this period. Robinson is Joseph Ogle Robinson, of Hurst, Robinson & Co, Constables’ new London associates.

Letter from Archibald Constable to Robert Cadell.
29 Nov 1819.
[…] shall I instruct them to print 1500 Guy—immediately […].
Source: E, MS 319, fol. 248v.
Notes: Thus authorising the ‘6th’ edn (1820), actually the 5th.

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
2 Dec 1819.
Guy Mannering should be set a going immediately—but Jas B[allantyne] Co should do it cheaply—the prices they have hitherto charged for these books is totally out of the question.
Source: E, MS 323, fol. 97v.

Letter from Archibald Constable to Robert Cadell.
6 Dec 1819.
Guy Mannering shall go to press as soon as Ivanhoe & the Poetry are off at press […].
Source: E, MS 319, fol. 262v.
Notes: The other references are to Scott’s novel Ivanhoe (EN2 1820: 63), then imminent, and the 12-volume Poetical Works of Scott (Edinburgh, 1820).

Letter from Archibald Constable to James Ballantyne.
8 Dec 1819.
I have an edition of Guy Mannering to put in hand as soon as you please, send me an Estimate of 2000 Copies.
Source: E, MS 790, p. 696 (copy).
Notes: Relating to the ‘6th’ edn (1820), actually the 5th.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Daniel MacCorkindale.
31 Dec 1819.
We have changed our plan as to the new Editn of Guy Mannering the impression is still to be 2000—but only 750 are to be on the paper you have in the office and are now using—the remaining 1250 are to be printed on the deny used for the Novels & Tales—to be fine work, and to be hot pressed—please order a Sheet or two [723/724] to be thrown off on the London paper fine work and hot pressed that we may see how it looks. [postscript] Shew this to Mr Ballantyne and be sure to use your best types on this work—I find there is sufficient of the fine Paper in the office for 1250—The paper to be laid for 1250 fine paper will be 2 rms 15 qrs each sheet. The common Paper to be laid on for 750 will be 1 Rm 13 qrs to each sheet—we request this may be accurately attended to.
Source: E, MS 790, pp. 723–24 (copy).
Notes: Two qualities of production are found amongst surviving copies of the ‘6th’ edn (1820). The other work mentioned is the 12-volume octavo collected Novels and Tales of the Author of Waverley (1819). MacCorkindale was an employee of the firm of James Ballantyne & Co.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Longman & Co.
26 Aug 1820.
We shall be glad to sell you any number you may wish of Guy Mannering.
Source: E. MS 791, p. 125 (copy).

Letter from Robert Cadell to Archibald Constable.
25 Oct 1820.
You will notice that I have made Robinson bolt almost all we have left of the Antiquary and an equal No of Waverley and Guy Mannering—of this last we have abundance […].
Source: E, MS 323, fol. 127v.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Mr Thurnham.
7 July 1821.
We cannot allow the abatements you have made on the Abbot, & Guy Mannering & Melmoth—Whatever London Booksellers may do [341/342] we have never done so at any time—not even for fifty Copies.
Source: E, MS 791, pp. 341–42 (copy).
Notes: Addressed to Thurnham at Carlisle. Scott’s Abbot is EN2 1820: 62. C. R. Maturin’s Melmoth the Wanderer is EN2 1820: 51.

Letter from Joseph Ogle Robinson to Archibald Constable.
13 Jan 182[3].
[22 copies on hand].
Source: E, MS 326, fol. 109.
Notes: Misdated 1822.

Letter from Archibald Constable & Co to Hurst, Robinson & Co.
15 Dec 1824.
[51 copies on their hands].
Source: E, MS 792, p. 376 (copy).

Ledger Entries:

Divide Ledger Entry, Longman & Co.
30 Nov 1814. To acceptance at 6 months John Ballantyne & Co: 500. 0. 0.
6 Mar 1815. To acceptance at 6 months John Ballantyne & Co: 491. 0. 0.
6 Mar 1815. [Bill to Longman & Co from] J Ballantyne at 5 months for amt overpaid: 100. 0. 0.
14 Mar 1815. By half profits 1st edn: 424. 14. 6.
[n.d.]. By half profits 2nd edn: 466. 14. 9.
Source: Longman Divide Ledger 1D, fol. 107.

Impression Book Entry, Longman & Co.
20 Feb 1815.
The 1st edn consisted of 2000 copies.
To transcribing the author’s MS: 18.18. 0.
To advertising: 50. 0. 0.
[n.d.]. 2011 copies were accounted for at the trade price of 0. 13. 9 each, for a total of 1367. 8. 9. With the deduction of the total outlay (including advertising) of 517. 19. 8, the total profit from the sale of this edn was 849. 9. 1.
Source: Longman Impression Book No. 5, fol. 178.

Impression Book Entry, Longman & Co.
16 Mar 1815.
The 2nd edn consisted of 2000 copies.
2000 copies accounted for at the trade price of 0. 13. 9 each, for a total of 1375. 0. 0. Adding the sum from 11 copies of the 1st edn (7. 11. 3) totals 1382. 11. 3.
Total profits (1382. 11. 3 minus costs of 449. 1. 8): 933. 9. 7. Half profits: 466. 14. 9.
Source: Longman Impression Book No. 5, fol. 184.

Impression Book Entry, Longman & Co.
9 May 1815.
The 3rd edn consisted of 3000 copies.
First 1000 accounted for at the trade price of 0. 13. 9 each, for a total of 687. 10. 0.
Cost for 1000 copies: 206. 17. 0; to advertising, 30. 0. 0.
Profits from the first 1000 copies: 450. 10. 0.
To author’s half share: 225. 5. 0. To Constable & Co ¼ share of profit: 56. 6. 3 (at 6 mos 9 May 1815).
‘See agreement when 1000 are sold. Author half share of 2nd 1000: 235. 0. 0. Constable & Co ¼ share: 58. 15. 0’.
Source: Longman Impression Book No. 5, fol. 197.

Impression Book Entry, Longman & Co.
Nov 1817.
The 4th edn consisted of 2000 copies.
The impression book shows that the total outlay of 360. 11. 6 was shared equally between Longman, Constable & Co and John Ballantyne (120. 3. 10 each).
2000 copies were accounted for at the trade price of 0. 13. 9 each, for a total of 1375. 0. 0. With the deduction of the total outlay, the total profit from the sale of this edn was 1015. 0. 0. Half of this profit (507. 10. 0) was shared equally between Longman, Constable and Ballantyne (each receiving 169. 3. 4).
Source: Longman Impression Book No. 6, fol. 123.

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Research Associates: Dr Jacqueline Belanger, Dr Sharon Ragaz;
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