British Fiction, 18001829

BROWN, Charles Brockden. Ormond (1800)

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Morning Chronicle

Fri, 23 Nov 1810. (1.4.4).
‘MR BROWN’S TWO AMERICAN ROMANCES’. 3v  15s.
Notes: [Books published this day] [also: Wieland] ‘The publisher has great pleasure in announcing edns of these two extraordinary and interesting works, which appeared some time since in America, and have been so eagerly sought for in this country by persons acquainted with the uncommon talents of the Author, and requests those who wish to secure copies, to send their orders immediately to prevent disappointment’. [also: in the press: Isadora of Milan]

Fri, 3 May 1811. (2.2.12).
‘MR BROWN’S AMERICAN TALES’. 3v  15s.
Notes: [Books published this day] [also: Wieland: ‘This work possesses strong and powerful claims to attention. The events which it relates are of a kind wholly removed from the ordinary train of Novels, and the Writer seizes with a sort of magic grasp the feelings he is desirous to call forth or to controul. The terrific sway of superstition over a vigorous but perverted mind, is most ably and forcibly depicted in the character of Wieland. Upon the whole, we have perused this Novel with great interest, and recommend it very strongly to those who are in the habit of reading works of this description, or who love to have their nerves agitated by the terrors of romance’. Critical Review]

 

Star

Thu, 22 Nov 1810. (1.1.5).
‘Mr. Brown’s Two American Romances. This day were published’. 3v. 15s.
Notes: [also: Wieland; ‘The Publisher has great pleasure in announcing Editions of these two extraordinary and interesting Works, which appeared some time since in America, and have been so eagerly sought for in this country by persons acquainted with the uncommon Talents of the Author, and requests those who wish to secure Copies, to send their Orders immediately to prevent disappointment’.] [also: in the press: Isadora of Milan]

Mon, 13 May 1811. (1.2.13).
‘Mr. Brown’s American Tales. Lately published’. 3v. 15s.
Notes: [also: Wieland, ‘This work possesses strong and powerful claims to attention. The events which it relates are of a kind wholly removed from the ordinary train of Novels, and the Writer seizes with a sort of magic grasp the feelings he is desirous to call forth or to controul. The terrific sway of superstition over a vigorous but perverted mind, is most ably and forcibly depicted in the character of Wieland. Upon the whole, we have perused this novel with great interest, and recommend it very strongly to those who are in the habit of reading works of this description, or who love to have their nerves agitated by the terrors of romance’. Critical Review]

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