British Fiction, 18001829

MATHERS, John [pseud]. History Of Mr John Decastro And His Brother Bat, The (1815)

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Morning Chronicle

Fri, 4 July 1817. (2.1.15).
‘[Books published this day]’. 4v 1. 4s. Boards.
Notes: ‘Some of the scenes (in the history of Mr. John Decastro) are in a style of broad farce which reminds us of Smollett’s laughable pages–the devices of Lady Charlotte and of Genevieve, the one to encourage a bashful swain, and the other to attract a philosophic lover, are amusing and ingenious, and many of the characters are drawn with more spirit and oddity than we often find in the Novels of the present day’. Monthly Review, June 1815. ‘We are by no means unwilling to confess that the book before us has, by its humour, operated powerfully on our nerves, and produced a longer succession of smiles, and more irresistible laughter than we recollect to have given vent to since our perusal of the Feasts of the Ancients [Peregrine Pickle]./ / The History of Mr Decastro and his Brother is written in a style which, if not elegant, is spirited and easy:–it presents several well-drawn characters, and sparkles throughout with genuine wit and humour. We consider the work deserving of perusal, and recommend it an an antidote to ennui. Its principal merit consists in the humour of the characters, a copious display of originality, wit, and humour, and the excellent moral tendency of the whole’. Critical Review, July 1815. ‘In point of humour this book stands without a parallel in our day, and we doubt very much whether Fielding or Smollett could, with any chance of success, dispute the palm with the History of Mr. John Decastro, of whose family we should be glad to see more particulars, not forgetting our good friend Old Comical’. New Monthly Magazine, Apr 1815.

 

Star

Mon, 29 Jan 1816. (1.2.5).
‘This day was published’. 4v 1. 4s. Boards.
Notes: ‘Some of the scenes are in a style of broad farce which reminds us of Smollett’s laughable pages... many of the characters are drawn with more spirit and oddity than we often find in the novels of the present day’. Monthly Review, June 1815. ‘We are by no means unwilling to confess that the book before us has, by its humour, operated powerfully on our nerves, and produced a longer succession of smiles, and more irresistible laughter than we recollect to have given vent to since our perusal of the Feasts of the Ancients [Peregrine Pickle]./ / The History of Mr Decastro and his Brother is written in a style which, if not elegant, is spirited and easy:–it presents several well-drawn characters, and sparkles throughout with genuine wit and humour. We consider the work deserving of perusal, and recommend it an an antidote to ennui. Its principal merit consists in the humour of the characters, a copious display of originality, wit, and humour, and the excellent moral tendency of the whole’. Critical Review, July 1815. ‘In point of humour this book stands without parallel in our day; and we doubt very much whether Fielding or Smollet could, with any chance of success, dispute the palm with the History of Mr. John Decastro, of whose Family we should be glad to see more particulars, not forgetting our good friend Old Comical’. New Monthly Magazine, Apr 1815.

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